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Wednesday, 2nd January 2019

New Year Honours 2019: Sustainability champions make Queen's list

The 2019 New Year Honours list has recognised the outstanding achievements of a number of senior figures across the UK's green economy.

Environment Agency director Ken Allison and  Marshalls’ director of sustainability Christopher Harrop were both recognised in the 2019 New Year's Honours list

Environment Agency director Ken Allison and Marshalls’ director of sustainability Christopher Harrop were both recognised in the 2019 New Year's Honours list

Environment Agency director Ken Allison has received a CBE, while Northern Powergrid’s head of network operations Rodney Gardner and concrete manufacturer Marshalls’ director of sustainability Christopher Harrop have both been handed an OBE.

Allison is in charge of covering flood and coastal risk management for the Environment Agency and was given his award for his work on the environment. He described the CBE as “an incredible and humbling privilege that reflects the hard work and dedication of people and organisations who manage flood and coastal risk in this country”.

Harrop has received an OBE for services to the prevention of modern slavery and exploitation. Stretching back to 2005, he has spearheaded Marshalls’ efforts to eliminate child labour and bonded labour from its global supply chain – particularly in countries such as India, China and Vietnam – as well as improving working conditions.

Under Harrop’s guidance, the business has helped to develop two new industry accrediations: BES 6001 Responsible Sourcing of Construction Products and BES 60002 Ethical Labour Sourcing Standard.

Commenting on his award, Harrop said: “Sustainability and ethics are not just ideals to me but essential foundations of market leadership and values that we have instilled in the Marshalls brand and business.

He added: “Despite this being a huge personal privilege for me, it is sad that slavery remains a scourge on humanity almost twenty years into the 21st century. Even in the UK, there are an estimated 136,000 people trapped in slavery today. One is too many, wherever they are.”